black-boys:

Conrad Bromfield by Frederike Helwig | 10 Men Magazine #35

black-boys:

Conrad Bromfield by Frederike Helwig | 10 Men Magazine #35

sheep-boy:

"guess we cant have different opinions on tumblr"

nah son. an opinion is like “orange juice is nasty” or “fall out boy is overrated”

"your gender identity is ridiculous and you dont deserve to have it respected" is straight up bullshit and you should be called out on it

nikipaprika:

just a comparison post phptptpt

i do like his dingus hair in the first one, i imagine that’s what it looks like after he gets it cut. but i think the second one is the length i imagine it/draw it usually. also i emphasised his wee tuft at the back of his head it’s my fave thing <333

also glad i took away the white from the glasses, i feel the detail/colour around the eyes was lost with it in :(

starbottled:

electromas:

naming your art files like

image

image

thaumivore:

request for celestialoctopi's headcanon cecil who is korean/native american, with bonus carlos c:

thaumivore:

request for celestialoctopi's headcanon cecil who is korean/native american, with bonus carlos c:

my favorite aesthetic would have to be the short period in the early 80’s when people still sorta clung to certain parts of the late 70’s but were slowly transitioning into the parts of the 80’s that most of us are familiar with today (teased hair, spandex, bright clothing, etc).

king-emare:

vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer

Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / / 3

As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]

©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved

I wish